Well begun is half done

Someone asked me recently how long I would take to recite Vishnu Sahasranama. I said: Hardly 2 seconds. He thought I was kidding till I explained my logic which is the following: Vishnu Sahasranama starts with: Viswam Vishnu……, Right? If we understand the meaning of this properly, where is the need to recite the rest of the mantras? These two words capture the quintessence of Vishnusahasranama and even Vedanta. Here’s the explanation: These two words mean that the Universe is Vishnu. Once we say the Universe is Vishnu, nothing else needs to be told. The universe with all its diversity, the living & the nonliving, the sun, the moon, the planets, the entire cosmic order , the mind & intellect, the psychological order etc  are all manifestations of Vishnu. So evidently, the rest of the Vishnusahasranama is merely a matter of detail. You can check it out.

This is the beauty of our scriptures. The beginning lines of many of our scriptures are so well written that it becomes easy for any reader to follow the rest of the text. Here are a few more examples:

Consider Bhagavadgita, for instance. It starts with the lines: Dharma Kshetre Kuru Kshetre……It’s so beautiful. The field of an epic battle is being described as Dharma Kshetra. This is where Dharma will win and get established eventually. Entire Mahabharata is about Dharma and Gita makes a bold statement of this fact in the opening line itself. The rest of Gita deals with Dharma & Karma in all its dimensions and explains how it can be a vehicle for attaining the ultimate Purushardha, namely, Moksha. What a brilliant  beginning to the sacred text!

Consider yet another brilliant work of Vyasa – Bhagavatam. Here’s how it starts: Satchitananda Roopaya, Vishva Utpathyadi hetave, Tapatraya Vinasaya, SriKrishnave Vayam Namah. This opening verse contains the essence of the entire Vedanta. Krishna is described here as Satchidananda roopa.  The same terminology is used in Upanishads also to describe the formless Brahman. From this it’s clear that Hiduism, while preaching worship of form(idol worship), emphasizes the basic formlessness of the God. Itself being formless, It accommodates all form. In other words, It manifests as diverse forms in the Universe. The Sloka quoted above says precisely the same thing in the first two lines. The third & fourth lines reveal the Lord Krishna as the manifestation of Satchitananda Brahman who alone can rescue us from the sea of Samsara or bondage. To me, this is yet another brilliant beginning for an epic which is all about Lord Krishna.

I will take a couple of more examples from Upanishads and rest my case.

Let us take Taitriya Upanishad. It starts off with the line: Brahma Vit Apnoti Param. Tadeshabhyukta. Satyam Jnanam Anantam Brahma. It says: One who knows Brahman attains the highest Goal(Param).Then it goes on to describe what is the attribute of Brahman. It says: Satyam Jnanam Anantam Brahma. Volumes have been written to explain just this statement alone which defines Brahman.  If one understands this one line properly, entire Taitriya Upanishad is as well understood and assimilated.

Esa vasyopanishad is another great example of a great beginning. The opening line of the opening verse is: Esa Vasyam idam Sarvam.… It declares straight away that Eswara pervades the entire Universe. This statement is similar to Viswam Vishnu of Vishnusahasranamam which we saw in the beginning.

I suppose one can go on and on with several examples from our scriptures on the importance of a good & insightful beginning to any great work.

The title of the post is an old saying attributed to the Greek philosopher Aristotle. Not satisfied with this proverb, the famous poet John Keats, in one of his letters, points out that a more appropriate saying is: ‘Not begun and yet half done’. I think this applies to Upanishads in a sense. All Upanishads begin with a Shanti Mantra or an invocation. These mantras, with their very profound meaning, set the tone for the main Upanishad text. The Shanti Mantra puts the student in the right frame of mind to absorb the Upanishad message. Thus the teacher’s job is already half done.

More on the Shanti Mantras in another post.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Published in: on May 1, 2017 at 11:26 pm  Leave a Comment  
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